Local Woman Pitches Her Child Care Aid To Walmart

Brett Blume
June 12, 2018 - 5:00 am

(KMOX/Brett Blume)

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ST. PETERS, Mo. (KMOX) -  Necessity was the mother of invention for one local woman, and now she's on the verge of landing a lucrative deal with Walmart.

 

When JoyLynn Waganer's twins were born two years ago she quickly found herself overwhelmed by what she calls the "Drop Game", in which toys, spoons and everything else were constantly being thrown onto the floor.

 

"So I needed to find a way that I could handle taking both of them out by myself," she recalls. "So my husband and I brainstormed and I dumped a lot of money into products that were already out there. But there wasn't one single product that met all of my needs."

 

So in the true spirit of necessity being the mother of invention, Waganer came up with her own solution through something she initially marketed as "The Drop Stopper".

 

"Although we are actually in the process of renaming to 'Drop It Baby'," she confides. "Because it's a positive connotation that says 'Go ahead and drop it because we have you covered baby!'."

 

What is the 'Drop It Baby"?

 

It's a series of interlinked, stretchy plastic rings attached to a super-strong suction cup.

 

It's already been FDA-approved as safe-to-chew and is being sold locally.

 

It's this line of products that also include teething aids that Waganer will be pitching when she goes down to Bentonville, Arkansas this week to meet the powers-that-be in the Walmart marketing department.

 

Her driving motivation?

 

"To be honest some people have asked me about the money," she admits. "And it really didn't cross my mind. If I can help parents be a little bit happier when they're out-and-about with their kids, I'm all for that. That's really what I want."

 

She'll be able to tell Walmart officials that her products are made in the USA and assembled in St. Peters.

 

Waganer hires local moms, something else for which she's proud because those who have children often need flexible schedules and her jobs are part-time.

 

She recently hired three more employees and knows she would likely need to crank up production in a major way if Walmart says "Yes" to "Drop It Baby".