STUDY: Pregnant women should be cautious of CBD oil

Not enough is known yet about its long-term impact.

Fred Bodimer
October 28, 2019 - 5:05 pm
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(KMOX) — A word of warning to women of childbearing years — be wary of Cannabis-based oils during pregnancy.

A recent study found 30% of women in California have a positive attitude toward the use of CBD for the treatment of nausea, pain or anxiety during pregnancy or labor.

Related: What you need to know when it comes to CBD

"The problem is that over-the-counter CBD products have little governmental regulation," said Dr. Mark Zakowski at Cedar Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles who conducted the survey. "The product may say a certain strength and may have more or less CBD and it may have tetrahydrocannabinol in it or other harmful contaminants like pesticides. There is not enough hard science for marijuana due to its classification from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.  We need to learn more about marijuana, and CBD specifically, to determine whether it really works for anxiety, pain or nausea. There are studies starting to come out. Just using CBD without scientific studies to support it is risky because no one really understands the impact on a pregnant woman and her fetus in the short or long term."

Dr. Zakowski presented his study during the recent gathering of the American Society of Anesthesiologists in Orlando, Florida.

"Marijuana, in general, we do not have good research on it," said Dr. Katherine Mathews, an OB-GYN at SSM Health St. Mary's Hospital. "The claims that people make about marijuana somehow being therapeutic — even the CBD oils — is not based on well-done studies. So because we don't have good information I really recommend — and our national organization recommends — be cautious, don't use."

Instead, Dr. Mathews says to tell your doctor why you think you need to use CBD oil.

Related: Illinois CVS Pharmacy locations soon to be stocked with CBD products

"Are they feeling nauseated? Well, we have other medications for that. Is she having trouble with anxiety or depression? We have other medications for that," Dr. Mathews tells KMOX. "So in those circumstances, we have much better information on what's appropriate for pregnancy and so we want to address whatever someone is struggling with — but we want to do it in the safest way possible."

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