Coastlines and beaches

In this Sept. 3, 2019 photo made available by Jessica Eldridge shows her husband's Smart car parked in their kitchen in Jacksonville, Fla. Patrick Eldridge parked his Smart car in his kitchen to protect it from Hurricane Dorian. In a Facebook post, Jessica Eldridge said her husband was "afraid his car might blow away" so he parked it in their Jacksonville home's kitchen. (Jessica Eldridge via AP)
Associated Press
September 05, 2019 - 7:58 am
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. (AP) — It started as a light-hearted challenge between a Florida couple, can a Smart car fit into their kitchen? The answer: Yes it can. Patrick Eldridge parked his smart car in his kitchen to protect it from Hurricane Dorian because he didn't want it to "blow away" and to prove...
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FILE- In this May 24, 2018 file photo, Fred Guttenberg speaks at a news conference, in Miami. Guttenberg speaks next to photos of his daughter Jaime Guttenberg, who was one of 17 killed in the Valentine's Day massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida. Fred Guttenberg will start his Thanksgiving morning at a cemetery. "This Thanksgiving is about loss," said Guttenberg who will visit Jaime's grave along with his wife, son and their two dogs. "It's my first Thanksgiving without my daughter and we're not going to leave her out of it." (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee, File)
November 21, 2018 - 2:27 pm
ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) — Mass shootings, hurricanes, fires — for many people across the nation, 2018 was a year of loss unlike any other. As the quintessentially American holiday of Thanksgiving approaches, some will abandon traditions or chose not to mark the holiday at all. Others will...
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A storm chaser climbs into his vehicle during the eye of Hurricane Michael to retrieve equipment after a hotel canopy collapsed in Panama City Beach, Fla., Wednesday, Oct. 10, 2018. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert)
October 10, 2018 - 3:14 pm
PANAMA CITY, Fla. (AP) — Supercharged by abnormally warm waters in the Gulf of Mexico, Hurricane Michael slammed into the Florida Panhandle with terrifying winds of 155 mph Wednesday, splintering homes and submerging neighborhoods. It was the most powerful hurricane to hit the continental U.S. in...
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Xavier McKenzie puts a twenty pound bag of ice into his family's car in Panama City, Fla., as Hurricane Michael approaches on Tuesday, Oct.9, 2018. He and his family do not live in a storm surge area, and instead prepared for losing power for days. (Joshua Boucher/News Herald via AP)
October 09, 2018 - 4:38 pm
TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — A fast and furious Hurricane Michael sped toward the Florida Panhandle on Tuesday with 120 mph winds and a potential storm surge of 13 feet, giving tens of thousands of people precious little time to get out or board up. Drawing energy from the warm waters of the Gulf of...
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Kyle Crawford uses a shopping cart to carry bags of ice he purchased days after Hurricane Florence in Wilmington, N.C. Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2018. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)
September 19, 2018 - 11:41 am
WILMINGTON, N.C. (AP) — The death toll from Hurricane Florence climbed to at least 37, including two mental health patients who drowned when a sheriff's van was swept away by floodwaters, and North Carolina's governor pleaded with thousands of evacuees not to return home just yet. President Donald...
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In this Monday Aug. 6, 2018 photo, dead fish are shown near a boat ramp in Bradenton Beach, Fla. From Naples in Southwest Florida, about 135 miles north, beach communities along the Gulf coast have been plagued with red tide. Normally crystal clear water is murky, and the smell of dead fish permeates the air (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)
August 10, 2018 - 3:10 pm
LONGBOAT KEY, Fla. (AP) — Tons of dead fish. A smell so awful you gag with one inhale. Empty beaches, empty roads, empty restaurants. A toxic algae bloom has overrun Florida's southern Gulf Coast this summer, devastating sea life and driving people from the water. "I've never seen it this bad,"...
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In this June 20, 2018 photo, Michael Scott Moore, author of "The Desert and the Sea: 977 Days Captive on the Somali Pirate Coast," poses for a portrait at Los Angeles Public Library in Los Angeles. Six and a half years after his abduction and nearly four years after his release following payment of a $1.6 million ransom, Moore has completed a page-turning thriller of a book describing the time he spent in gruesome captivity. The book will be released on July 24. (AP Photo/Chris Pizzello)
July 22, 2018 - 10:18 am
LOS ANGELES (AP) — Michael Scott Moore is walking a bit gingerly these days, but it has nothing to do with the 2½ years he spent imprisoned by Somali pirates, the beatings he suffered, his time spent in chains or the lousy food that caused him to lose 40 pounds. "I got thumped by a wave surfing off...
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